PUGLIA, ITALY - Oct 26 - Nov 2, 2013 || why you should come :)

so i decided to scout out the interwebs and give you a list of all the REMARKABLE reasons WHY you should come to PUGLIA, ITALY this coming OCTOBER 2013.

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taken from LONELY PLANET:

Puglia is sun-bleached landscapes, seascapes and silver olive groves; hilltop and coastal towns; factories and power stations; taranta (mesmerising local folk music); fields polka-dotted with spring flowers; cigarette- and people-smuggling; elderly men on benches and bicycles; elderly women on string chairs outside their houses; summer carnivals; immigrants arriving by boat; and dialects that change from town to town.

that sounds fantastical! talk about experiencing ITALIAN culture!! let’s read on…

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Italy’s heel has the country’s longest coastline – 800km of it. Two seas meet here: the Adriatic to the east and the Ionian to the south. It’s legendary for its foodstuffs, in a land where food is all-important. The region looks out to sea and bears the marks of many invading overseas visitors: the Normans, the Spanish, the Turks, the Swabians and the Greeks. Puglia feels authentic – in some places it’s rare to hear a foreign voice. In July and August it becomes a huge party, with thousands of Italian tourists heading down here for their annual break.

Italy’s heel has the country’s longest coastline – 800km of it. Two seas meet here: the Adriatic to the east and the Ionian to the south. It’s legendary for its foodstuffs, in a land where food is all-important. The region looks out to sea and bears the marks of many invading overseas visitors: the Normans, the Spanish, the Turks, the Swabians and the Greeks. Puglia feels authentic – in some places it’s rare to hear a foreign voice.

ok seriously?? is this place for real???

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then i headed over to an article posted in the UK’s TELEGRAPH:

…you’ll find yourself among the huge olive groves (Puglia produces almost half of all Italy’s olive oil) that cover low, fertile hills rolling down into the sparkling blue-green Adriatic Sea. On a clear day you can see across to Albania.

Wine lovers will enjoy tasting the local grapes - the region was once known as “the wine cellar of Europe”. Castel del Monte is produced in the north, and in the south, full-bodied reds such as Negroamaro and Malvasia Nera are popular. The local whites are lighter and include those from Locorotondo and Martina Franca.  

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The empty beaches provide serious chilling space. There is shale rather than sand underfoot, but the water is clear and warm. Private beach clubs abound along the coast, and some will let you join for a day to take advantage of their sunbeds, cafés and showers.  

Puglian cuisine is a happy revelation: dig into the simply cooked fresh produce - including an abundance of seafood - and try the local pasta, orecchiette (which means little ears).  
 

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from my own personal EXPERIENCE, olive oil tasting is RIGHT up there with wine tasting - for reals…fresh bruscetta and olive oil, with wine?? come on! this very well could be HEAVEN ON EARTH here people!!


ciao!

xotracey

 

all photos courtesty of max brunelli :)

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